RWA Countdown: Getting the most out of RWA–Some Tips for Newbies

krlqqghzI’ve only been once, so this is definitely a guide for those new to this conference. Hopefully this will help me provide you with some tips from a newbie’s perspective, since the experience was so recent. But it also means you won’t find veteran tips here, though I do have some location specific tips near the end.

I think Rule Number One to keep in mind is:

Most likely the person standing next to you is new too! At the very least, she (and sometimes he) will be nice or an introvert like most of us writers and won’t bite your head off if you initiate conversation. I’m serious. Don’t be afraid to introduce yourself while you’re waiting in line to get that free book from your favorite author. Who knows, that person could be screwing up the nerve to introduce herself to you!  Don’t know what to say as an icebreaker? The easiest one to remember and makes the most sense: So what kind of stories do you write?

Set a goal for the conference

This may sound weird, but this is a huge conference and it’s really easy to become overwhelmed and stand in a corner clutching your conference goody bag, wide eyed. You’ve spent a lot of money to come to it, and it would be a shame to go home and think it was a waste of said money, especially when the success hangs on you. I read this tip before I went to the conference last year, and it’s so true: set achievable goals. Before you head out, think about what would make you smile and feel like it was worth going–and be realistic. Don’t make it ‘come away with an agent contract’ or ‘everyone turns to me in a workshop and remarks how brilliant I am.’ Pitching to an agent? Your goal is to pitch to them without dying. Maybe make it a goal to meet five new people. Needing to hone your craft? Concentrate on the workshops you need. And don’t be distracted by what others are doing–remember, everyone has different goals. If your goal is honing your craft, don’t get distracted by all the people talking about all the free books they got. Sure you got some great free books, but standing in the lines made you miss one of your most-looked-forward-to workshops and you’ll be disappointed later.

Pack with care

Last week I talked about packing, so I won’t get into it too much here, but be aware of your body’s needs and the time constraints of the conference. Do you know that you have to be hydrated, or you’ll drop? Pack a water bottle and fill it at water fountains. It’s such a waste of time to stand in the long lines to get an over-priced bottle of water. Think about what you need to stay focused and happy, and see if there’s a way for you to pack something that will help you. Running around at the conference hotel for it five minutes before your pitch starts is a bad idea.

I also packed flattened boxes that were a good size for holding books, a roll of packing tape, and a sharpie. That way I didn’t need to hunt these down there and was able to ship back all my free books using the US Post Office’s media mail rate (muuuuch cheaper than regular mail, and cheaper than paying the overages airlines charge now).

Free books!

Yep, what you’ve been hearing is true. Books are given away like candy, and most of the time you can get them signed! I think I came away with 80+ books last year. Here’s what’s going on: publishers want to not only market their various imprints, they also want to help educate potential clients on what they look for, so they give them away to us. During various times of the day (printed in the schedule) there will be room(s) dedicated to certain imprints for their authors to sign books. You go in, find the authors you like, and stand in line. But don’t be one of those that goes to the front and just grabs a bunch; not only is it rude, but there are a limited number, and those patiently standing in line will be pissed if they see you do this, especially if there’s no books by the time they get to the table. It’s also disrespectful to the author. They are there to meet you.

Tips re: books

  • I had two of these reusable shopping totes that roll up small and fit in my purse. That way I was ready to snap it open and stuff it with books.
  • Some bring boxes to the signing rooms or snag empty ones in the rooms
  • Mail them back using USPS Media Mail
  • Return often to your room to offload your stack 🙂

Pitching

I’ve written several posts regarding this, Agent Pitch Prep Tip: Make Dossiers and Pitching at a Conference? Set Fire to the Rain! but one big thing that really helped was getting pitches out of the way first thing in the morning on the first day. Not only will this reduce your anxiety level for the rest of the conference, but you’re also pitching to an agent who’s fresh and hasn’t heard a zillion pitches already. Didn’t get your fave agent or editor? Hang around the pitch room–they post open pitch slots that you can nab.

Also, arrive early! I can’t tell you how many people lost out because they showed up just five minutes beforehand–that’s too late folks. It takes time to corral everyone into their lanes and feed them into the room. You need to be there in time for that. To be safe, get there 20-30 minutes before your pitch starts.

Handouts

This was my only sore point last year. Everything I read and researched online about what to expect said that at previous conferences, they’d handed out a thumb drive of all the workshop handouts, so I knew I’d have those to rely on if the presenter ran out, etc. But last year, they didn’t provide them. And they also didn’t have handouts printed for the attendees. You could go online to print them out, but I didn’t have a printer handy. If, like me, you like to have these during a session, go ahead and print them out before you go. One of my friend’s had done this and I was so envious.

Schedule

Mark not only your first choice, but your second. Sometimes workshops will get cancelled, or it’s not what you were expecting–now you have a backup to go to. (It’s okay to come and go during a session, just be quiet about it).

Food

Put granola bars or the like in your purse to tide you over–believe me, you’ll want these. Also, there are two food courts easily accessible from the Marriott without even having to go outside. There’s the Peachtree Center food court (which is huge, and also has a CVS)–there’s a skybridge from the Atrium level if you go to Marquis Tower I. Also on the Atrium level, if you go toward Marquis Tower II, you can access the SunTrust food court. There’s also PLENTY of dining outside the hotel.

Getting around

Hopefully they’ll provide maps of the hotel in our conference packets, since this is a large hotel with many conference rooms and ballrooms on several levels. If you want to see it beforehand, here’s a link to ones that Dragon*Con provides (I’m a regular attendee, which is why I’m so familiar with this hotel).

Dress

Dress professionally, you are your brand, so be conscious of how you’re presenting yourself, even if you’re not pitching. Even if you are, keep it up even after your pitches, as agents and editors may see you after. Think about what you’d wear to your first book signing and wear that.

Act professional

I love to party and drink with the best of them, but last year I refrained from partying–I had a few beers to relax, but that’s it. My goal wasn’t to party, plus I can start getting silly if I drink too much and I sure didn’t want a potential agent sitting a table over to witness me in that state. I’ve heard horror stories from other agents who’ve seen writers throwing up in hallways, etc.

In conclusion

I honestly think folks get out of an experience what they take into it. If you’re looking for things to be sour about, you’ll find them. But why not go into it with a positive attitude and count up the great things you experience? Go into it with a friendly attitude and everyone else will be friendly too.

What about you? Will this be your first time? If you’re a veteran, do you have any tips? I know I only scraped the surface…

RWA Countdown: Why Packing for a Trip is like Writing–Do It with Purpose or It Can Cost You

download (5)In exactly four weeks, myself and fellow romance writers will be converging on Atlanta for Romance Writer’s of America’s (RWA) national conference and I thought I’d dedicate the remaining Writer Wednesdays to posts on prepping for it, as well as tips.

To start off, this is a recycled post from last year, my first trip to RWA, and the prepping definitely paid off! This year I won’t be flying, but I might be taking Megabus instead of driving, which also has baggage restrictions.

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If you’re a romance writer, then you know that a week from now several thousand romance writers will be descending on Anaheim, CA for the annual Romance Writers of America (RWA) conference. I’m going for my first time, and it’s also the first time I’ve flown since the airlines started charging for extra baggage.

Yesterday morning I looked up the dimensions of the bags I’m allowed and the weight restrictions and started planning on how I could trim what I normally pack for a trip. That same morning, I came across Jami Gold’s post, The Ultimate #RWA12 Conference Packing List and it got me thinking–packing for a trip is a lot like writing. I love metaphors, let’s see how far I can run with this.

Know the purpose for your draft/trip

Each novel is going to go through multiple revision passes. In the early draft phase, some things are not as important and so it doesn’t pay to get worked up over it. For instance, a first draft is just getting your story basics down. The next pass will be structural, making sure you have a solid plot. It would be costly time-wise, to polish any of your prose at this stage, or to ask/pay someone else to give you line edits, since any line, paragraph or scene could change dramatically or get cut.

How is this like packing? If it’s just a quick trip to a familiar place, the stakes aren’t high, and you’re driving, you can be pretty casual about packing. You won’t be penalized for throwing anything or everything into your car and sorting it out later. You have a rough idea of what you need and go with it. Since the stakes aren’t high, it won’t matter if you forget something.

Weighing each word/item

Once we get to that final polish before submission, however, the stakes are different. Now you need to scrutinize every word and scene to make sure it serves the purpose of your story. I’m at this stage with MUST LOVE BREECHES. I’m doing a mind-numbing Find for a long list of words and phrases that could either be cut, or that could be red flags for my prose. I’m only on Chapter 8, but I’ve already cut over 800 words I did not need! I have to do it in chunks, because it is so tedious, but I know the story will be better in the end. I’m at the pre-submission stage for this WIP.

How is this like packing? It’s like my preparation now for the RWA conference. The stakes are high, it’s a costly trip, and I’ll be flying where I need to be careful about what I pack or the airline will charge me. So, I’m going through absolutely every article I’m bringing to see if it can serve several purposes, to see if I actually need it, and in the case of toiletries, if it can be poured into a smaller container. A small tube of toothpaste still gets the job done, but will be more efficient (like that shorter sentence after you trimmed out those words you didn’t need). For a normal trip, I already have a pre-packed toiletries bag I just pull out and throw in stuff I use everyday but don’t have duplicated. It’s quick, it’s efficient and I’m on the road, no agonizing. But I can’t do this for this trip. I’ll be taking everything out of that bag and evaluating it. Just like in a rough draft, it’s okay to write clichés or insert extra ‘baggage’ we don’t need, but for a final draft? No way.

Research

At some stage, you will need to do research for your novel, especially if the stakes are high. First drafts can have placeholders, but final drafts cannot. Some things you write will come from your acquired knowledge, but the true test is recognizing your own limitations and knowledge gaps and to take steps to amend them. You can also surprise yourself in what you find when you research that can make your story stronger.

How is this like packing? For my first writer’s conference, I was driving and I was going to a city I was familiar with, so some things I knew what to pack and plan for. But there were also gaps in my knowledge that I recognized and took the steps beforehand to research, mainly the agents I’d be pitching to. So I researched them, made dossiers, and packed them.

Not researching can also lead to missed opportunities. Case in point: I was perusing some posts on the conference and saw that Saturday night is a big dress-up deal, as in folks wear ball gowns! If I hadn’t taken the time to familiarize myself with what was happening, I wouldn’t have known and wouldn’t have packed one. Fortunately for me and my limited budget, I’m a denizen of Mobile and Mardi Gras balls, so I can simply choose one from my closet and pack it. Now, I understand that one can attend in business casual, but they’re in the minority and I would’ve hated missing an opportunity to dress up like that. How often do you get to wear a ball gown?

Personality and brand is important

While there are guides to writing well, at some point you need to be skilled enough to let your unique voice shine through your writing and know when to break the rules. You will also bring your own sensibilities and mindset into your writing. You also are nurturing a brand–you.

How is this like packing? There are tons of advice out there about what to pack and what to wear for your trip, but ultimately you need to be true to yourself. You’ll pack things that show your personality, sometimes without you even realizing what it says about you. Are you someone who always packs a deck of cards, just in case?

Since my RWA trip is about furthering my writing career, and is not just a trip to the beach with family, you better believe I’ll be packing with this in mind. Yesterday at Target, I bought a little Yoda plushie that I can attach to my conference bag to help distinguish it from the 2000 other bags, but I chose it because it’s f&*)*ing Yoda! And see, that’s part of my brand as a geek girl romance writer. Unfortunately my geek clothes are all super casual, so completely inappropriate for this conference. My funds didn’t allow me to purchase funky, dressier stuff only nice, classic clothes on clearance, but it will give a professional appearance which is vital. If I ever get successful, I’ll be able to not only afford it monetarily but flaunt convention a tad.

It can cost you

Failure to understand the nature of the writing business can cost you. The title of this post uses the phrase ‘do it with purpose’ instead of  ‘do it correctly’ for a reason, though. You need to go about writing with a clear purpose at every stage, but there is no “right” way to do it. However, if you fail to do it with purpose, it will cost you. Perhaps it’s not having patience enough to seek outside opinions and self-publishing your first novel. I just read a comment from someone who only had friends and family proof her work before she put it up. She got some pretty bad reviews, which she said stung at first. She admitted though that now that she’s going to critique groups, she’s realized her story could have been much better. The cost to her? Bad reviews and potential brand damage.

There are so many other ways it can cost you– submitting to agents/editors before the story is as polished as it can be, or not researching said agents/editors, will cost you the ability to pitch to them again for the same project, for example. Just like any stage of writing, this needs to be done with purpose as well.

How is this like packing? Used to be you could throw anything into a suitcase or more than one and check it. No longer. Money is tight for me, so it totally sucks that I have to pay $25 to check my bag, but I already know I won’t be able to take everything in a carry-on. However, I do not want to go over the 50lb limit, or check a second bag, so I’ll be going over everything to make sure I don’t incur any more costs. I’ll be packing with a firm purpose. Just like in writing, as I mentioned above, I’ll be scrutinizing every item to make sure it serves the purpose of this trip.

It can also cost you during your trip if the stakes are high. For instance, if I didn’t do any research or planning and just quickly packed for this trip willy-nilly, oh boy would it cost me professionally when I arrived. I would have been ill prepared and come across as unprofessional.

Veteran Writers/Packers

Because I’m a new writer my knowledge is pretty limited. Especially compared to the multi-published authors. There are a lot of things that are second nature to them that I have to consciously do, or strive for, or learn. I’ll make mistakes along the way. I already have, in fact. I’m learning.

How is this like packing? Veteran conference goers will have an easier time than I will packing for this trip. They know what to expect, what to bring. They’ve made mistakes in the past and learned from them, and get better and better each time they go.

How about you? Are you going to RWA? Did this metaphor make a lick of sense? Do you see other ways packing is like writing that I missed?

A Conversation with RITA Finalist Cynthia Eden

Today on Paranormal Unbound, I chat with RITA finalist Cynthia Eden! Have you had a chance to read The Fallen series yet? What do you like most about them? Stop by and join the fun!

Paranormal Unbound

Happy Friday everyone! I’m so pleased today to welcome my fellow Gulf Coast Chapter RWA chaptermate Cynthia Eden to the blog today! I was so excited when they announced the RITA finalists to see she’d made the list for Angel in Chains! I really enjoyed her Fallen series and she agreed to let me grill, er, I mean, ask her polite questions! So without further ado–

13517402First, congratulations on being a finalist! Can you tell us a little about your Fallen series?

Thank you for the congrats! And thank you so much for interviewing me!  I’ve had such a wonderful time writing my Fallen books. The Fallen books are dark and sexy—filled with lots of twists and suspense. In those tales, my angels must confront an onslaught of human emotions—the angels feel emotions for the very first time when they lose their wings (and fall into the mortal realm).

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The Inside Scoop on Getting In Bookstores – Things You Should Know

1.10.10Barnes&NobleCliftonCommonsByLuigiNoviMost people who know me online probably don’t know this, but I work in a local independent bookstore and I’ve been wanting to write this blog post for a while, because nothing turns me from being the ra-ra writer supporter I am with my writer friends online and locally than when I’m at the bookstore and an indie or self-pubbed author comes in with the attitude. And generally it’s the entitlement attitude. Before I go further, I want to qualify all this in case some interpret this to mean that writers owe obeisance to bookstores and should be humble and stuff. No. That’s not what I’m saying — I’m not saying bookstores are above writers in any way, shape or form. Yes, they are gatekeepers, but I’d like to think that they are/could be an indie writer’s ally or partner. Some of this post is going to necessarily be anecdotal, but I’ll also share some tips, as well as some ground-breaking changes in how distributors are handling indie books.

Be aware of how you present yourself

Just as with anything in this business, be conscious of how you are presenting yourself as this is a professional setting. Be courteous and friendly as you would in any other kind of business setting. Think of bookstores as potential clients, maybe, if that will help? This may sound like a no brainer. But let me tell you, in my role on the bookstore side more often than not, authors harm themselves in this regard. I’ve seen the following:

  • Writers who were visiting from out of town, and were only here for that day, and were upset the owner/decision maker wasn’t in at the time they showed up. And they took it out on me, the store clerk. I wanted to say to these authors they shouldn’t have assumed this and called ahead and made an appointment. I even had one go so far as to insist I call the owner (on his day off!) and tell him this author was in town for just that day. I refused and tried to explain this would only turn off the owner and he got more and more pushy and later harassed me with phone calls. He ended up leaving a courtesy copy. It later sold, but did we ever reorder? No. And it had potential as it was geared to a popular regional cooking style in the area. But the author was so obnoxious to the owner, it soured it for him.
  • We have one local author my boss won’t order any new releases from because when that author had their (I’m using a non-gender form on purpose) debut signing at the bookstore, they were extremely rude to my boss. This not only affected their future releases, but also that current one as it was afterward buried in the regional fiction section, spine out, and it’s not one they push or recommend. And we recommend LOTS of books EVERY day.
  • Writers who come in with the attitude that we’re obligated to carry their book

Okay, even I’m getting turned off by the negativity of my own post, LOL. So let’s move on and talk about how you can get in bookstores, yay! Because despite how it might sound, I DO want you to be in them.

Price your books with bookstores in mind

Most authors who come into the store don’t understand this and want to sell their book to us at the retail price. Bookstores are a business and just like any others that sell products, we order our books (products) at wholesale prices so we can turn a profit. Otherwise, how could we exist? Typically, we get a 40% discount from the major distributors like Ingram and Baker & Taylor. We also have the ability to return them if they don’t sell (and that’s important to remember). So if you go with a small press, make sure they offer their books through one of those two distributors. That will make it a LOT easier to get picked up as the bookstore can order it with all the other books they order. Self-published? Set your retail price with enough of a margin so that giving bookstores this discount won’t cut into the production cost.

Some bookstores allow you to sell your book via consignment, but be aware that not all do (ours doesn’t). And if they do, understand that they’re doing it to support local authors knowing that they aren’t making anything off of it. Check a bookstore’s website to see their policies. For instance, this indie bookstore in Atlanta, Bound To Be Read, has this on their website:

If your book is available through a distributor such as Ingram or Baker and Taylor, please contact Jeff McCord by e-mail or by phone at 404-522-0877.  If your book is self-published or published through a small press, we may consider taking it on consignment after review.  Because of limited space, consignment is usually restricted to local authors.  Call or e-mail Jeff McCord for more information.

Book Soup in LA has this posted (misspellings are theirs):

All consignment requests must be made in writing. We regret that we are unable to accomodate walk-in visits. In keeping with our general inventory only bound books with legible titles on their spines will be considered. To submit a book for consideration, please drop off a copy of the book along with a one-paragraph letter including your telephone number, mailing address, and promotinal material and a self-addressed stamped envelope with sufficient return postage. The submission should be marked “Consignment Request” and dropped off at the Book Soup information desk or mailed to the store address. Requests which fail to provide the information listed above will not be considered. Our review process takes four to twelve weeks. The book (not the promotional materials) will be returned in the self-addressed envelope, along with a letter notifying you of our decision. Books submitted without a self-addressed stamped envelope will be held at Book Soup information desk for pick-up. After 90 days, books not picked up will be recycled. If your book is accepted for consignment, you will have the opportunity to discuss your work with our buyers. Unfortunately, prior to acceptance, requests to contact bookstore personnel in person, by phone, or by email will not be granted. With this in mind, the decision made by our buyers is final. Book Soup is proud to support the writing community through our consignment program. Our buyers do the best to provide shelf space and display opportunities for consignment books, while still keeping in mind our inventory needs and the interest of our customers. Consignments are books that Book Soup agrees to add to our inventory with the understanding that payment will only be made on completed sales. We look forward to reviewing your work and we thank you for your interest in Book Soup.

Let friends know it’s there!

Okay, you’re in the bookstore, yay! But like with any other aspect of indie publishing, you need to promote. Let folks know it’s there. We have some local indie authors who do well because they tell their friends we have copies. One local author even has her car wrapped! It worked at least once, because someone came in the store saying they’d seen it and had checked out the blurb online and came into our store and bought it. We have others though that don’t take this step and the book never sells (only making my boss more reluctant to buy books from other authors since he can’t return them if they don’t sell and he doesn’t take consignments).

Make the decision easier

I asked my boss what would make it easier (besides being available through Ingram) and he said to give him a review copy and a flyer with the blurb, how to order, and reputable reviews (not reviews on Amazon–his words, not mine). I also think it makes a difference making an appointment or catching him when he’s there. Sending it via mail is too easy to put off. A review copy is important because the decision maker needs to be able to determine whether they can SELL the book to their customers. They’re not going to outlay money for a book that will just sit on the shelf collecting dust. Indie bookstore owners know their local market and what sells. Plus, they could become a new fan and actually actively pimp your book if they end up loving it! We definitely have some faves at the store that we pimp.

New policies at the distributors have changed the landscape!

I read about this initially on Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s blog back in April and thought at the time it would be a great addition to this post if I ever got around to writing it. But I think this post on Judy Goodwin’s blog summarizes it succinctly and has a link to Rusch’s post if you want to read more. Basically, the two major distributors (Ingram and Baker & Taylor) have changed their policies and now list indie books mixed in with traditional titles and offer the 40% discount and same return policy. This is HUGE folks. As it also means you also have a chance of getting picked up by the chain bookstores too! It’s not all indie books–I think it’s only with books in CreateSpace’s Extended Distribution and other qualifiers– Goodwin’s post has the deets.

In summary, put yourself in the bookstore owner/manager’s shoes and understand this is a business, not a lending library or non-profit whose mission is to carry your book. And like with any other aspect of this business, do your homework and research what your stores’ policies are. I also apologize if any of this came across as scolding–that was not my intention. I want to see indie authors be successful but just have witnessed too many fail due to things they can control, and I hate to see that.

What about you? Have you had trouble getting in local indie stores? What have you found that works? What are your indie stores policies? Do you have any other tips to share?

Tweetable: The Inside Scoop on Getting In Bookstores – Things You Should Know @AngelaQuarles  <–Click to tweet

Photo source: By Nightscream (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Book Monday: Recent reads in erotic, paranormal, contemporary and spoof romance

seductionhyposthesisThe Seduction Hypothesis by Delphine Dryden (Erotic/BDSM)

(1 Curious Sub + 1 Dom in Denial) – Inhibitions = 4 Naughty Nights

Wildlife biologist Lindsey thought attending a fan convention with her new boyfriend Ben was a great idea—until their relationship imploded. Lindsey still lusts after her ex—but if he wants her, he’s going to have to prove he can give her what she needs.

Ben will do anything to win Lindsey back, and when he sees her in her skimpy black vinyl convention getup, he realizes what she’s been craving all along. And he’s inspired to finally give in to his own dark desire to take complete sexual control…

Lindsey is surprised by her reaction to Ben’s kinky new seduction techniques, and suddenly sees the brilliant but boring code guru in a different light. After several erotic encounters in hotel rooms and stairwells, she’s falling for him all over again. And wondering if the intimate connection will last once they head home…

This is the second book in Dryden’s The Science of Temptation series. I talked about the first book in this post, Some Geek Romances Old and New and so was eager to read the second one when it came out recently. If you read my erotic geek romance, Beer and Groping in Las Vegas, and you don’t mind reading about the BDSM lifestyle, you’ll enjoy this book too! It also takes place with a fan convention as the setting, and is rife with geek references and humor, including a, uh, creative use of Gandalf’s staff (I will not say anything more). I really enjoyed the hero’s earnest, but adorable, fumblings. If you’re picky about how accurate BDSM is portrayed, don’t look to me, as I have no idea, but this was a fun read!

dontbitethebridesmaidDon’t Bite the Bridesmaid by Tiffany Allee (Light Paranormal)

Alice Shepard needs one thing: a date for her sister’s wedding. And not just any date. A hunk who will make her fiancé rue the day he left her for her best friend. Her drop-dead gorgeous neighbor fits the bill—even if he is a bit quirky and never comes out during the day—and Alice has downed just enough appletinis to ask him. But she makes it quite clear that there will be no funny business.

Spending a week on a cruise ship full of humans while sleeping close to his sexy next-door neighbor sounds like a helluva bad idea to vampire Noah Thorpe. But his friends need time to get him out of a shotgun wedding—a vampire bonding that will tie his fate to a female vampire he’s never met. And Alice’s offer comes at just the right time.

What could possibly go wrong?

This was a fun, light read. I’ve been having a bit of bad luck lately with light paranormals and finally read one that I enjoyed. The previous ones seemed to confuse light, quirky and fun with bad writing, sloppy one dimensional characters and flat plots. Just because it’s light, doesn’t mean you get to skip all the craft! This had the right blend of humor, characterization and an engaging plot. NOTE: I received this book from Entangled Publishing, LLC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. However, I only post reviews for books I enjoyed, so if I got one from there that I didn’t like, you won’t see it on this blog. The formatting was off for my Kindle, but I’m hoping it was just that way for the NetGalley readers.

sealofhonorSeal of Honor by Tonya Burrows (Romantic Suspense)

It’s a good thing Gabe Bristow lives and breathes the Navy SEAL credo, “the only easy day was yesterday,” because today, his life is unrecognizable. When his prestigious career comes to a crashing halt, he’s left with a bum leg and few prospects for employment that don’t include a desk.

That is, until he’s offered the chance to command a private hostage rescue team and free a wealthy American businessman from Colombian paramilitary rebels. It seems like a good deal—until he meets his new team: a drunk Cajun linguist, a boy-genius CIA threat analyst, an FBI negotiator with mob ties, a cowboy medic, and an EOD expert as volatile as the bombs he defuses. Oh, and who could forget the sexy, frustratingly impulsive Audrey Van Amee? She’s determined to help rescue her brother—or drive Gabe crazy. Whichever comes first.

As the death toll rises, Gabe’s team of delinquents must figure out how to work together long enough to save the day. Or, at least, not get themselves killed. Because Gabe’s finally found something worth living for, and God help him if he can’t bring her brother back alive.

I don’t read a lot of romantic suspense, but oh boy–that cover! The chesticles and that stance! *grabs fan* This is the first in Burrows’ HORNET series and I really enjoyed it. It had me turning pages and Gabe was so opposite personality-wise from Audrey it was fun seeing them mix, but you could see why each needed the other. Presumably the rest of the wacky team will be featured in future books, which promises some great reading. NOTE: I received this book from Entangled Publishing, LLC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. However, I only post reviews for books I enjoyed, so if I got one from there that I didn’t like, you won’t see it on this blog. The formatting was off for my Kindle, but I’m hoping it was just that way for the NetGalley readers.

piratedave Pirate Dave and his Randy Adventures (Career Ending Romance Spoof) by Robyn Peterman

Free on Amazon, so you can’t beat that! Robyn Peterman’s novel How Hard Can It Be? had the heroine make up a crazy plot for a romance novel to foil a plot-stealing best-selling author and Peterman’s readers asked to have that story told in full. And this is the hilarious result! Not for the easily squeamish, this is an hilarious, profane romp featuring conjoined twins, a handsome but dirty pirate, and other zany characters and scenarios. Not to be taken seriously folks!

Have you read and enjoyed any of these? What are you reading right now?

Tweet: Recent reads in erotic, paranormal, contemporary & spoof romance. From a geeky Dom to a randy pirate @AngelaQuarles <–Click to Tweet

Is your WIP in need of some manscaping? Pluck out those to-be verbs (From the Archives)

I published this post originally back in the fall of 2011 and as I sit here completely blank on what to post today, I thought I’d pull up this fun post. So here’s the old post, with some small changes:

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Is your WIP in need of some manscaping? Pluck out those to-be verbs. Or at least eliminate enough of the suckers so they’re not populating your manuscript like the wiry hairs on a hirsute male.

Argh! As my fingers poise over my keyboard, I hesitate. Recently, I’ve become loathe to point out style advice like this when critiquing because this might be someone’s style. In fact, my fingers hesitated so much, I just returned to writing this after taking a 2 hour procrastinating tour around twitter and klout. Sigh. Okay, getting over it. Onward.

So, what do I mean by to-be verbs? These are any time we use is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been in constructing our sentences. These verbs indicate a state of being, which is important to remember when applying this guideline because sometimes what we really want to illustrate is movement, not a persistent state. But! There are times when we DO want to indicate a state of being and using a to-be verb is entirely appropriate rocks (like the to-be I used in the second sentence of this paragraph).

Like any writing tip, this is a guideline only. Not a rule. You should only write what resonates with you.

In case you do want to see how it might improve your story, here are some structures to look out for in your WIP. I like to see them as flags of possible weak areas. I find them, analyze, and either leave them as is, or change them:

  • was + -ing. Just convert the -ing into the action verb. These are the easiest to fix. He was riding > He rode. Sometimes we can go even further, because it’s still not specific enough. For instance, he was speaking before a large group could be changed to he spoke before a large group, but that’s still pretty blah. What kind of mood is he in? What’s happened leading up to this? Can we use this to illustrate the character? Possibly! Maybe something like: he hunched over the microphone, eyes downcast. He swallowed and… you get the idea…
  • was + adjective. They can indicate we’re telling and not showing. Consider something as simple as this: He was gorgeous. That’s telling. How was he gorgeous? Describe what makes him gorgeous to the narrator. As often is the case when showing and not telling, we will use more words to show his hunkiness to the reader. Just using shortcuts like this, or the house was elegant, the food was tasty are like placeholder cards (cardboard cutouts!) scream ‘cardboard cutout!’ in your manuscript telling the reader how they should feel about a character or envision the scene. Better to take the time to describe it in a way that empowers them to feel and see it on their own without tacking on such a nonspecific descriptor. The reader will be pulled into the story in a much more visceral way. Plus, everyone’s tastes are different differ, so what’s tasty or beautiful to one person might not be that way for another, so we’re missing a chance for character development here.
  • was + verb + infinitive verb. Here are two examples from my WIP: she was tempted to say became she itched to say and they were due to leave  became they planned to leave.
  • was + adjective + noun. Again from my WIP: She longed to tell him, but really that was a stupid idea became She longed to tell him, but that would top the list of stupid things to do.
  • was + noun forms of verbs. Just convert it to its original verb. For instance, she was the inventor of… can be she invented
  • was + any kind of word expressing emotion. For example: He was scared about the monster under his bed. Don’t label the emotion, show it instead. A five-headed beast with poisonous drool lurked under his bed, without a doubt. Just his luck, too, today of all days. He sidled across the wall, one eye peeled

There are probably other structures where this pesky guy shows up, but these should get you started. The point is to be aware of it and really scrutinize whether it’s the best way to describe it captures your character or scene. Sometimes it is does! Or it would be very strange to convert it. Or that’s the voice of your character. Or it fits the rhythm. But if you’re getting feedback that your prose is lackluster, consider going on a fishing expedition through your WIP with a pair of tweezers in hand. Sometimes it will be really hard to find another way to say it (at least it is for me!) but when I finally do, it pops! And generally characterizes my heroine or hero in a much better way. I’m offering this tip precisely because it is something I still struggle with it and didn’t find a heck of a lot of practical advice out there, other than don’t use it. I liked Shirley Jump’s example (tip #2) in her article Show Not Tell: What the Heck is that Anyway?

And in case you thought my opening sentence was just for shock value I wrote the opening sentence for shock value, I really did have a purpose. Some people really like overly hairy men, who am I to judge? Same with writing guidelines like this. If it works for you, do it, otherwise don’t; leave the hairs in, or pluck ’em.

How about you? Do you struggle like me trying to convert to-be verbs? Do you have other tips for helping to eliminate them where advisable?

Tweetables:

  • Is your WIP in need of some manscaping? Pluck out those to-be verbs @AngelaQuarles  <–click to tweet
  • If your prose is lackluster, consider going on a fishing expedition through your WIP for to-be verbs @AngelaQuarles <– click to tweet

It’s RITA month on ParaUn–Open Thread

Today I’m doing Genre Talk over at Paranormal Unbound. Come check out the diversity of paranormals up for the RITA– Let’s talk paranormal & RITA!  Have you read any of these yet? Do you feel they represent the best of the Romance genre? Do any of them push past the stereotypes of the genre? Do any break the rules, redefine the genre and are stuffed full of awesome?

Paranormal Unbound

RITAPara

We’ve already started spotlighting some of the paranormal finalists in Romance Writer’s of America’s annual award, the RITA, with RITA Celebration on Paranormal Unbound: Ghost Planet by Sharon Lynn Fisher, A Chat With RITA Finalist J.T. Geissinger, and Interviewing RITA Finalist – Maggie Shayne and while we can’t cover all of the finalists, we’ll do our darndest. But at least we’ll officially kick it off today by spotlighting what RWA has deemed the best of the genre as it relates to paranormal fiction.

While there are eight slots for the Paranormal category, books that fit in the paranormal genre actually garnered seventeen of thirty-three eligible slots (The Haunting of Maddy Clare finaling in both Best First Book and Novel with Strong Romantic Elements)!  In fact, three of the four YA finalists are paranormal, as well as three of the eight Best First Books,  two in Novel with Strong Romantic Elements…

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Monday Hunk Who Reads – Ryan Gosling

gdcgraphics [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

gdcgraphics [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Ryan Gosling

It’s the first of the month, and in an effort to get my old Hunk posts scrubbed of copyrighted material, I’m pulling up this one that had been taken offline and fixing it. So this month, it’s Ryan Gosling! He’s definitely a reader as there’s some photo documentation:

That book is so fucked up; that story’s the worst. I mean, at the end the tree is a stump and the old guy just sitting on him #8212; he’s just used him to death, and you’re supposed to want to be the tree? Fuck you. You be the tree. I don’t want to be the tree.

Is he keeping the tattoo though?

Tangentially related to reading, is his recent participation of Funny or Die’s Drunk History reading of A Night Before Christmas, also starring Eva Mendes and Jim Carrey.

It was hard finding out about his reading habits because of a certain meme we’ll explore below, but I did find out he was diagnosed with ADHD as a child which caused him to have trouble reading. He obviously conquered it. From that same article, he reveals this about Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, by Haruki Murakami: “You can’t put it down. All these movie studios are trying to buy his books and he won’t sell them.”

I gave up trying to find more about what he likes to read, however, because searching on Google for it was just too crowded with this phenomenon:

For some reason only the meme gods understand, he’s the subject of a number of “Hey Girl” internet memes that started with F*%kYeahRyanGosling where posters pretend he’s their boyfriend saying supportive/sexy things. There’s now a bunch of them (for computer nerds, museum loverspolitical junkies and many more) but the ones that relate to books I couldn’t resist sharing. This one for librarians, got a giggle from me:

And then one about reading YA books and I had to share this one because this seems to be the theme lately with my writing friends and me (*now going to post this as the blog post pic for my last writing post on internal dialog*):

And one where we pretend he’s in the world of publishing:

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. Reading is sexy people!

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

Past Hunks Who Read/Related Articles:

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner